Three ways to elevate your design by utilizing texture

Sample room with wood, stone and other textured elements.

Sample room with wood, stone, fabric, metal and other textured elements.

Texture is an important element to elevating design. To achieve a designer finish, Perry Newman advises “stay within your palette and use lots of textures for interest.” Utilizing different textures can help create the perception of a feeling, balance the room by weight or contrast and add interest while highlighting a focal point. Proper, careful placement and use of a variety of textures can lead the eye through a room and create the desired ambiance. Here are three suggestions to making the best use of texture:

 

  • Sample room with brick, wood, glass and metal textures.

    Sample room with brick, wood, glass, plant and metal textures.

    Texture adds dimension and different moods can be achieved through selecting the right combination (even while staying within the colors in your palette). For example, rough textures feel warm because they do not reflect as much light as a smooth surface. They also have a rustic vibe, while smooth textures seem more modern and feel cooler because they reflect more light. A bold texture creates depth and enhances the feeling of warmth. Movement and tranquility can be achieved by repeating shapes and patterns (the way being near water and seeing the ripples on a pond can soothe and mellow a person’s emotions). Unity and integrity can be conveyed by matching borders on different elements in the room. Playing with textures can strike any mood between creating drama or giving the impression of a relaxing, faraway place.

 

  • Texture on shower wall

    Adding texture to accent a plain white wall gives an upscale, luxury feel without adding any color at all.

    Different finishes (smooth, matte, course, fine, etc.) can add interest and depth to a neutral room, keeping it timeless but making it homey and livable. When placing objects in the design consider whether the texture offers a visual or tactile experience or both. The more bold or rough a texture is, the heavier the piece will appear. Smoother or shiny textures look lighter and can be used for contrast. Utilizing texture to make features in the room appear heavy or lighter provides an opportunity to balance the room or create imbalance and angst, depending on the look a designer is striving to achieve.

 

  • Finally, consider placement and selection of textured objects to combine into an appealing overall concept. Things like tree branches, wood, textiles, draperies, art or brick can be altered to stand out as a focal point or blend in to conform. For example, a brick wall left as it is may be a feature in the room but painted a neutral color it fades away, offering the interest of the brick texture, but not detracting from the carefully placed focal point. Natural elements that are incorporated into the design add an appealing, earthy feel. Things like plants, sisal, wood, etc. are elements to consider incorporating for added interest.

 

texture sample room with horse art

Sample room displays texture of glass, brick, sisal rug, fabrics, stone, metal, plants and wood.

Perry Newman says an easy way to bring texture into a design is carefully selecting fabrics on the furniture but a less expensive alternative is to choose different fabrics on throw pillows. Remember that adding a variety of trims and fringes adds interest. The same is true for draperies and art. Just stick to your palette plus white, black and grey. If you would like a designer eye to help make your texture choices, the professionals at Perry Newman Design can help you take your home renovation project from conception, through construction, to completion. Call Perry today at 801.971.0868 or fill in the contact form at perrynewmandesign.com.

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